For The Love Of Family and Friends

Traditional Meat Winter pudding

Remembering The Love of Family and Friends

Christmas time – ah, the Satsuma’s and the cinnamon, snowballs and tinsel, a time for remembering the love of family and friends. But have you ever wondered why we do some of the things we do at Christmas? Why do we eat Christmas pudding and mince pies? Why do we send cards and are they just as popular as ever?

Well, Pudding originated as a 14th century porridgy soup that was made of beef and mutton with raisins, currants, prunes, wines and spices and was eaten as a fasting meal in preparation for the Christmas festivities. There is a popular belief that plum pudding’s association with Christmas goes back to a custom in medieval England that the “pudding should be made on the 25th Sunday after Trinity, that it be prepared with 13 ingredients to represent Christ and the 12 apostles, and that every family member stir it.”

Traditional Meat Winter pudding

Modern Christmas Pudding

Mince Pies, like Christmas Puddings, were originally filled with meat, such as lamb, rather than a dried fruit mix as they are today. They were also first made in an oval shape to represent the manger that Baby Jesus slept in, with the top representing his swaddling clothes.

Traditions

In Pagan Britain, good luck charms were given during winter solstice.

During the 1600’s In Germany, religious families sent New Year cards.

In the 1840’s Queen Victoria initiates the custom of sending Christmas cards.

678.9 million Christmas cards were sent in the UK in 2010 compared to 1.5 billion in the USA

Sending e-cards and text cards is now a more popular choice of well wishing.

A great website for everything Christmassy is Why Christmas which gives information on traditions, surprising facts and some great ideas for things to do.

Now We are Grown Up

A revival in drinks such as the Snowball and Sparkling Perry evoke childhood memories back to the time when Christmas day lasted forever, Auntie Mabel had a small glass of sherry “just one” and the pile of presents was like Snowdonia. Now we are grown up here are a couple of gorgeous Christmassy grown up cocktails for you to enjoy –

White mulled wine

Pomegranate Christmas cocktail 

However you celebrate Christmas this year, be it with the few “allowed” members of family and friends or quietly with no visitors, my colleagues and I at HomeStore, would like to wish you all a Very Merry Festive Season and Prosperous New Year.