How confident are you about going out as non-essential businesses open?

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Lifting of Restrictions to some Non-essential business

From June 15 opening restrictions on Non-essential shops, zoos and National Trust outdoor spaces have been lifted.

Of course, shops have had to put in safety measures, sanitisation stations, screens and safe distancing guidance, which will mean the queues outside will continue. Local authorities have introduced one-way systems for walking and have also closed some roads in town centres to ensure people remain safe.

While picnics are possible in outdoor National Trust locations, cafes and indoor buildings remain closed (at the time of writing) and the National Trust has introduced a booking system for visitors in order to control visitor numbers.

Changing Habits

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People expected it to take months or years before returning to a restaurant

It has been said that people’s habits are likely to change following the easing of restrictions, partly because of environmental and sustainability concerns and partly because of the rise of online shopping.

But how do they feel about their personal safety and how much will habits change?

A recent survey carried out by EY and published in CityAM has asked 1000 consumers these questions.

It found that four in five people said they would be uncomfortable trying on clothes in a store, while only a quarter said they feel comfortable going out to buy groceries, despite it being a necessity.

Bars & Pubs

Also, the survey suggested that 45 per cent of UK consumers believe the way they shop over the next one to two years will change, with 64 per cent saying they expect to go shopping less frequently but will spend more when they do.

It also found that more than two-thirds of respondents expected it to take months or years before they will return to a restaurant, and nearly three-quarters said the same about bars and pubs.

It would seem we have become more risk-averse as a nation thanks to the pandemic and it may be a long time before things return to “normal”.

Image: NickyPe @ Pixabay