Homes Through the Ages

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The stuff we think we need – it wasn’t always so

While most of us wouldn’t want to go back to the way people lived centuries ago, it is interesting to look at the development of possessions through the ages.
It is only in the last hundred years or so that what we consider the essentials in our homes has become such a long list.

This Month In Suffolk – Thomas Wolsey

Thomas Wolsey

Thomas Wolsey was educated in Ipswich and then studied at Magdalen College, Oxford. He was ordained around 1498 and became chaplain to the archbishop of Canterbury and later chaplain to Henry VII.
He was known as an efficient administrator and was often sent on diplomatic missions but his real rise in influence came in the reign of Henry VIII, when he was created archbishop of York and a year later the pope made him a cardinal. Soon afterwards the king appointed him lord chancellor.
For the next 14 or so years, he was given the responsibility for more and more state business, eventually gaining almost complete control over England’s foreign policy.
He amassed great wealth which he invested in building both his London home, York Place in Whitehall, and at Hampton Court, 20 miles south west of London. He also founded Cardinal College at Oxford (later King’s College, and now Christ Church). Whilst in Ipswich at St Peters Church stands “Wolsey’s Gate”. It is Grade I listed and a Scheduled Ancient Monument.

Not surprisingly increasing arrogance contributed to his lack of popularity, but his downfall came when he failed to arrange the annulment of Henry VIII’s first marriage to Catherine of Aragon, whose nephew, the Holy Roman Emperor Charles V, dominated the pope at the time.
Wolsey was accused of treason and arrested near York in 1530 and died in November of that year on his way to London to face trial.

Historical Importance of Preserving Photographs

Preserving and Storing Photographs is Important for Historical Research

Preserving and storing photographs is important for historical research. Photographs are of immense value to scholars in many fields, not only for historians, as a visible record of many aspects of life throughout the centuries, they also have great sentimental value for families and individuals throughout their own lives.

The older they are the more vulnerable to damage photos become. Printed on paper and given a coating of chemicals they are sensitive to light, heat and even to touch.

Paper can become brittle and yellow if exposed to too much light. Handled too often photographs can become